BBC Needs More Over 50s Says Report

BBCA report into how many over 50 presenters/actors appear on television has concluded that BBC One should have better presentation of older people.

 

A report into how many over 50 presenters/actors appear on BBCtelevision has concluded that BBC One should have better presentation of older people. The report follows an investigation by The Anchor Trust into how many “older faces” appeared on television programmes across a one-week period. The report found that on BBC One only 20% of actors or presenters were over the age of 50 compared to 27% for ITV. A more detailed breakdown of the findings show that 28% of “faces” on BBC One’s news programmes or current affairs output were “older faces” compared to 31% for ITV1.

 

 

The investigation into how many “older faces” appear on television was conducted for one week, 24 hours a day, in February but excluded repeats, imported programmes such as Mad Men, regional programming or shows that had no presenter but a narrator instead. Also those who appeared more than once across the one would as more than one “observation”. So those presenters that have regular shows, Paul O’Grady for example, would be counted as a “observation” on each night of his Channel Four chat-show.

 

The reports concludes that the BBC, especially BBC One, needs better representation of “older people” in its output. It comes as the corporation has faced allegations of ageism from some in the press for the replacement of Arlene Phillips by Alesha Dixon on Strictly Come Dancing and a few years ago the decisions of newsreaders Anna Ford and Moria Stuart to step down from their roles. However, Moira Stuart and Julia Somerville have now returned to the corporation.